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Ports of Ridgefield, Woodland get state money

The Washington State Community Economic Revitalization Board handed out more than $5.2 million in low-interest loans and grants to support community, economic and broadband development to agencies around the state.

Locally, the Port of Ridgefield and Port of Woodland both received money from the board.

Ridgefield received a $733,029 loan and $286,971 grant for the Wisdom Ridge Business Park Phase I project, which will encompass a 20,000-square-foot metal building on land zoned for light industrial uses. The building will be adjacent to the Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife building, and will house one or several tenants.

According to information from the port, the building will have facilities for offices, manufacturing/shop space and some warehousing.

The state funds are matched by almost $2.5 million in local resources.

The Port of Ridgefield also received a $473,250 loan and a $473,250 grant for the Discovery Corridor Phase I project, which will consist of the construction of roughly 25.5 miles of aerial and buried fiber to serve the city of Ridgefield. The state funds are matched by $315,500 in local resources.

In Woodland, the port received a $50,000 grant for the Martin Bar industrial conceptual site study, which will assess two industrial lots for potential industrial and marine terminal developments. The sites are located along the Columbia River and accessible to the navigation channel. State funds are matched by $349,000 in local resources.

The Port of Woodland also received a $2.25 million loan and a $750,000 grant for the Centennial and Rose Way Infrastructure and Building project, which will see the construction of roadways, utilities and a port building at the Centennial and Rose Way Industrial Parks. The port is partnered with Columbia Precast Products, which is investing $1.5 million. The state funds are matched by nearly $5.8 million in federal and local resources.

Since 1982, the board has committed nearly $176 million to local jurisdictions across the state.

“Getting communities the economic development infrastructure they need to be competitive is a top priority for (the Washington State Community Economic Revitalization Board),” Randy Hayden, board chairman, said in a release from the organization. “These projects will help businesses expand and create new jobs, and provide greater opportunities for the citizens of Washington state.”


Source: https://www.columbian.com

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